Kazbek User Guide

Kazbek includes two traditional Georgian/Armenian instruments recorded on location by local musicians.

The duduk is a double reed instrument with a sound similar to an English Horn. It’s usually played in pairs with one player performing the melody while another plays a drone.

There are two types of salamuri, reeded and non-reeded, Kazbek contains the latter. It’s a fipple flute style instrument, similar to a recorder. According to wikipedia legend salamuri tunes cheer people up, tame animals, make birds sing, and relieve human sorrow.

Installation

All Libre Wave virtual instruments and effects follow the same installation procedure. Please see the detailed installation guide for instructions on how to setup this product on your system.

Interface

Quick Start

  • The menu at the left can be used to move between the various control sections – Mixer, Velocity, Expression, etc.
  • When you move a knob or slider with your mouse its value will be displayed.
  • Hold down ctrl or cmd to increase precision when you move a knob or slider.
  • You can double click a knob or slider to reset it to its default value.
  • If you hold the shift key while clicking on a knob or slider an input box will be displayed where you can enter a specific value.

Automation

To use MIDI learn to link a continuous controller (CC) to a knob or slider:

  1. Right click the control.
  2. Select MIDI learn.
  3. Move a hardware knob, wheel, or fader to assign it to the control.

Many of the knobs have default CC assignments. You can view all CC assignments in the MIDI Automation tab of the Settings window. This is explained in more detail later in this guide.

You can remove CC assignments, including those assigned by default, by right-clicking the control and selecting Remove CC.

Many of the on-screen controls will respond to automation within your DAW without needing to assign a CC to them first. Check your DAW’s user guide for details on how to access automatable parameters.

Keyboard Layout

Salamuri Keyboard Layout
  • The illuminated black and white keys show the playable range of the currently loaded instrument.
  • The coloured keys trigger ornaments and phrases.
    • Salamuri: Yellow keys trigger rips (up and down).
    • Salamuri: Green keys trigger bends.
    • Salamuri: Red keys trigger runs.
    • Duduk: Yellow keys trigger trills.

Dynamic Controls

Velocity

Note on velocity (how hard you hit a key) controls the attack of each note. Playing a low velocity will create a longer attack and a high velocity will produce a shorter attack.

Velocity can also be used to control the initial Dynamic of a note. You can enable this using the button in the Dynamics section of the interface.

Vibrato

Vibrato XY Pad

The vibrato intensity and rate can be controlled using either the two independent sliders or the XY pad. The XY pad is a great option when using a touch screen and provides continuous control over both parameters at the same time.

The vibrato intensity control (beneath the XY pad) sets the amount of vibrato that will be applied.

The vibrato rate control (to the right of the XY pad) sets the speed of the vibrato. The higher the value the faster the vibrato will be.

Expression

The expression control provides an overall volume change to the instrument. This can be used in conjunction with the dynamics controller to customise the dynamic range of the instrument and create niente effects.

Dynamics

Each instrument was recorded at three dynamic levels. The dynamics control allows you to smoothly crossfade between these recordings. A volume change is also applied automatically to keep the dynamics consistent and realistic across the range of the instrument.

Pitch Bend

You can use your MIDI keyboard’s pitch bender wheel to bend the pitch of a single note up or down by up to one semi-tone.

Sensitivity Curves

Many parameters have editable sensitivity curves. These enable you to adjust how the instrument responds to you when you perform with a MIDI controller.

  • Move a node by clicking on it and dragging.
  • Add a new node by clicking anywhere along the curve that doesn’t already have a node.
  • Delete a node by right clicking it.
  • Edit the curve between two nodes by hovering your mouse cursor over a node and moving the scroll wheel up or down.

Performance Techniques

The library is designed to be performed in real time and contains a few features to make obtaining a realistic performance easier and more natural for a keyboard player.

Using a Breath Controller

The breath controller mode can be enabled in the interface’s dynamics section. In this mode no sound will be triggered until the Dynamics controller is at a value greater than 10. If the value drops below 10 any notes that are playing will be stopped. You should assign your breath controller to control Dynamics.

Note duration

Holding down a key will sustain a note. For a realistic performance you should try and keep in mind how much air the player would be using to hold the note and stop when appropriate.

You can use the continuous controller assigned to dynamics to create swells, crescendos, diminuendos, or any other dynamic expressions. A breath controller, mod-wheel, or expression pedal is perfect for this.

To play a short note just release the key earlier and the note will be shorter. Play the note at a higher velocity with a brief swell on the dynamics controller to create a punchy staccato note. Using more or less force, releasing the key earlier or later, and varying the dynamics can create a variety of short articulations.

Attack and Accents

Playing very softly, with a velocity below 20, will trigger a slower attack, a velocity above 20 but below 70 will trigger a normal attack. When playing at velocities of 70 or above an attack overlay sample will be triggered first and blended smoothly into the start of the sustain sample.

Legato

Playing in an overlapped style, holding one note while playing the next, will trigger a legato transition between the notes. You don’t need to worry about pacing your playing to get a smooth transition or to compensate for lag. The instrument will detect your playing speed, the pressure you’re using on the keys, and a few other parameters to calculate each transition.

Retrigger

A sustain pedal (or other controller assigned to CC64) can be used to retrigger a note. Whle the sustain pedal is held down any key that is released will be retriggered. Releasing the sustain pedal will stop the note.

If you want to retrigger a note immediately after a glide you need to release the sustain pedal at the end of the glide and then hold it down again before releasing the key for the retrigger.

Trills

Trills of any interval, duration, or tempo can be played in a very natural fashion using the built-in retrigger feature. Hold down the first note of the trill while pressing and releasing the second. This is especially realistic when the library is used in combination with a breath controller linked to dynamics.

Glides

Glissandi, slides, and portamento can be triggered by pressing one key while another is already held and your sustain pedal (or other controller assigned to CC64) is engaged. Playing with a lower velocity will trigger a slower glide while a higher velocity will create a faster one.

Chords

Although the instruments in this library are monophonic it is sometimes useful to be able to play two or more notes at once. The library has a built in chord detector that will attempt to differentiate between a legato transition and playing a chord. There is no guarantee that it will be accurate 100% of the time. If you try to play a chord but only one note sounds it means the system thought you were trying to play a legato transition. This feature should be used sparingly and is included as a tool for composing rather than for crafting a realistic performance.

Preset Browser

The plugin includes a selection of default presets which you can customize and you can also create your own.

The name of the currently loaded preset is always displayed at the top of the interface. Clicking on it will open or close the preset browser. The arrow buttons next to the name can be clicked to load either the previous or the next preset.

The browser is divided into separate columns which are used to organize the presets into categories or banks. The presets themselves are displayed in the right most column.

Filtering

You can filter the list of presets by typing in the search bar at the top of the preset browser and hitting enter.

Clicking the star icon next to a preset will add it to your favourites list, clicking it again will remove it from your favourites. You can see all your favourites by clicking the larger star icon next to the search box.

Adding and Editing Presets

Click the Add button beneath the appropriate column to add new categories, banks, or presets. You can use the Delete and Rename buttons to edit existing entries.

You can save any changes you’ve made to an existing preset by clicking the Save Preset button next to the search bar.

Adding or saving a preset stores the state of the controls on the interface as well as the currently loaded samples.

Import and Export

Clicking the More button will open a drop down menu offering you a number of options for importing and exporting your presets.

Settings

The settings screen gives you control over the sampler engine, hardware configuration, and MIDI options. The settings that are available will vary slightly depending on if you are using the standalone instrument or the plugin.

Engine Tab:

  • Standalone application only
    • Driver: This is used to set the audio playback system that the instrument will use. The choice of drivers will vary depending on your operating system.
    • Audio Device: You can select which hardware audio output device (soundcard/audio interface) you want the instrument to use.
    • Output: If your chosen device has multiple outputs you can use this menu to select which will be used by the instrument.
    • Buffer Size: This is the buffer used by your chosen audio device. Lowering the buffer size reduces latency but if it’s too low it can cause pops and clicks to be heard.
    • Sample Rate: This is the sample rate of your chosen audio device. The available options will vary based on your hardware.
  • Standalone application and plugin
    • UI Zoom Factor: You can increase or decrease the size of the instrument’s interface using the options in this menu. All of the instrument’s graphics and text are designed to scale perfectly without blurring or fuzziness.
    • Streaming Mode: Select the option that suits the type of drive you are using to store the instrument’s samples.
    • Max Voices: The amount of polyphony the instrument can handle. If the value is too low you may notice some dropouts when playing a lot of notes.
    • Clear MIDI CC: Use this button to reset all MIDI continuous controller assignments you have made using the MIDI learn feature.
    • Change sample folder location: If you move the samples to a new location you can use this button to point the instrument to them.

MIDI input tab: Displays the hardware MIDI devices that the instrument can see. You can check the boxes alongside the device names to enable those devices for MIDI input. This tab is only visible in the standalone application

MIDI channel tab: From here you can select the incoming MIDI channels that the instrument will respond to.

MIDI automation tab: Displays information about any MIDI continuous controller numbers you have assigned using the MIDI learn feature. It also allows you to adjust the range of values that the continuous controllers will use and provides you with a quick way to invert the values if desired.

About tab: Shows information about the plugin. If you ever require assistance with the plugin it’s a good idea to provide its version number which you’ll be able to find in this tab.

Acknowledgements

Recording Coordinator: Olajide Paris
Editing: Olajide Paris & David Healey
Scripting & Graphics: David Healey
IDE: HISE

O’Malley’s Irish Whistles User Guide

Tin whistle, penny whistle, English flageolet, tin flageolet, Belfast Hornpipe, feadóg stáin, and of course Irish whistle are just some of the many names given to the traditional Celtic fipple flutes.

O’Malley’s Irish Whistles includes D, C, Bb, and Low D whistle sample sets. This library was recorded in the same studio as Michaela’s Harp.

A live performance recorded during the sampling session

Musician

Mimi O’Malley

Mimi O’Malley is a multi-instrumentalist singer-songwriter. She has toured internationally with various bands, playing many styles and genres in a wide variety of ensembles.

After many years of playing Irish whistle in pubs and working through her clarinet and saxophone grades she gained a place at Chethams School of Music where she studied under James Muirhead (Halle Orchestra) and Joanna Patton (Liverpool Philharmonic).

She continues to travel and perform in venues small and large and is currently working on a solo album.

Installation

All Libre Wave virtual instruments and effects follow the same installation procedure. Please see the detailed installation guide for instructions on how to setup this product on your system.

Interface

Main Interface designed by Koke Núñez
  • Hold down ctrl or cmd to increase precision when you move a knob or slider.
  • You can double click a knob or slider to reset it to its default value.
  • When you move a knob or slider with your mouse its value will be displayed.
  • If you hold the shift key while clicking on a knob or slider an input box will be displayed where you can enter a specific value.

Automation

To use MIDI learn to link a continuous controller (CC) to a knob or slider:

  1. Right click the control.
  2. Select MIDI learn.
  3. Move a hardware knob, wheel, or fader to assign it to the control.

Many of the knobs have default CC assignments. You can view all CC assignments in the MIDI Automation tab of the Settings window. This is explained in more detail later in this guide.

You can remove CC assignments, including those assigned by default, by right-clicking the control and selecting Remove CC.

Many of the on-screen controls will respond to automation within your DAW without needing to assign a CC to them first. Check your DAW’s user guide for details on how to access automatable parameters.

Keyboard Layout

On-screen keyboard
  • The playable range of the currently loaded instrument is illuminated on the keyboard.
  • Grey keys are outside of the playable range and produce no sound.
  • Key switches (used for changing articulation) are coloured red and will always be positioned outside of the instrument’s playable range.

Articulations

You can select an articulation by triggering a key switch or sending a UACC continuous controller message. Changing articulation using UACC (Universal Articulation Controller Channel) is done by setting a value on MIDI CC32.

NameDescriptionKey switchUACC/Program
LiveMonophonic with legato, staccato overlay, and retrigger.C120
SustainPolyphonic sustained notesC#11
StaccatoPolyphonic short notesD140

Round Robin

Round robin on/off

The live and sustain articulations include two recorded repetition samples. The staccato articulation and legato transitions use four recorded repetitions in a true-random pattern.

Live Techniques

The Live articulation is designed to be performed in real time and contains a few features to make obtaining a realistic performance easier and more natural for a keyboard player.

Using a breath controller

Breath mode button

When the breath controller button is enabled the Live articulation’s breath controller mode will be engaged. In this mode no sound will be triggered unless the Dynamics knob is at a value greater than 10. If the knob’s value drops below 10 any notes that are playing will be stopped. You will probably want to assign your breath controller to the Dynamics knob.

Long notes

Holding down a key will sustain a note indefinitely. Every sample will loop so you can maintain a note of any length. For a realistic performance you should try and keep in mind how much air the player would be using to hold the note and stop when appropriate.

You can use the continuous controller assigned to dynamics to create swells, crescendos, diminuendos, or any other dynamic expressions. A breath controller, mod-wheel, or expression pedal is perfect for this.

Short notes

To play a short note just release the key earlier and the note will be shorter. Play the note at a higher velocity with a brief swell on the dynamics controller to create a punchy staccato note. Using more or less force, releasing the key earlier or later, and varying the dynamics can create a variety of short articulations.

Attack and accents

Playing very softly, with a velocity below 20, will trigger a slower attack, a velocity above 20 but below 70 will trigger a normal attack.

When playing at velocities of 70 or above a staccato overlay sample will be triggered first and blended smoothly into the start of the sustain sample.

Legato

Playing in an overlapped style, holding one note while playing the next, will trigger a legato transition between the notes. You don’t need to worry about pacing your playing to get a smooth transition or to compensate for lag, the instrument will detect your playing speed, the pressure you’re using on the keys (velocity), and a few other parameters to calculate each transition.

Glides

Glissandi, slides, portamento, and smears can be triggered by pressing one key while another is already held and the sustain pedal (or other controller assigned to CC64) is engaged. You can glide across any interval using this method.

Same note legato

A sustain pedal (or other controller assigned to CC64) can be used to trigger a legato transition on a single note. When the sustain pedal is held down any key that is released will be retriggered. Releasing the sustain pedal will end the note.

If you want to trigger a same note legato transition immediately after a glide you need to release the sustain pedal at the end of the glide and then hold it down again before releasing the key to retrigger the note.

Trills

Trills of any interval, duration, or tempo can be played in a very natural fashion using the built-in retrigger feature. Hold down the first note of the trill while pressing and releasing the second. This is especially realistic when the library is used in combination with a breath controller linked to dynamics.

Chords

Although the instruments in this library are monophonic it is sometimes useful to be able to play two or more notes at once. The Live articulation has a built in chord detector that will attempt to differentiate between a legato transition and playing a chord. There is no guarantee that it will be accurate 100% of the time. If you try to play a chord but only one note sounds it means the system thought you were trying to play a legato transition. This feature should be used sparingly and is included as a tool for composing rather than for crafting a realistic performance.

Performance Controls

Performance controller knobs

Velocity

When using the Live articulation the note-on velocity controls the attack of each note. Playing a low velocity will create a longer attack and a high velocity will produce a shorter attack.

Velocity can also be used to control the initial Dynamic of a note. To activate this functionality you need to enable the small round button next to the Dynamics knob. This will cause the Velocity Control button to be displayed which you can then activate.

Expression

The expression control provides an overall volume change to the instrument. This can be used in conjunction with the dynamics controller to customise the dynamic range of the instrument or create niente diminuendos.

Dynamics

The dynamics controller allows you to smoothly change the instrument’s dynamic. A volume change is also applied automatically by this controller to keep the dynamics consistent and realistic across the range of the instrument. Like all fipple flutes the playable dynamics of the Irish Whistle are limited and vary across the range of the instrument, generally low notes are soft and high notes are loud.

Vibrato Intensity & Rate

The vibrato intensity knob controls the amount of vibrato. The vibrato rate knob controls the speed of the vibrato. A lower value will produce a slower vibrato while a higher value creates a faster vibrato.

Pitch Bend Wheel

All of the whistles in this library respond to the pitch bend controller. This is a great way to play simple slides into and out of notes in real-time.

Response Curves

Dynamics response curve

Next to each performance control knob is a small button which when enabled will display the response curve for that control. If none of the buttons are enabled the response curve for velocity will be displayed.

You can edit the response curve to adjust the control’s sensitivity.

Master Output

Master output controls

The master output controls allow you to adjust the sound of the instrument after any sonic changes created by the other controls.

  • Pan: This controls the left/right balance of the instrument.
  • Volume: Provides the final stage of the instrument’s volume control. It can also provide a gain boost of up to +3dB at its highest setting.
  • Coarse: tune Tuning control in the range of -12 to +12 semitones.
  • Fine tune: Tuning control in the range of -100 to +100 cents.

Preset Browser

Preset browser
Preset name display

You access the preset browser by clicking the name of the currently loaded preset which is displayed on the main interface. The arrow buttons on either side can be used to load the previous or next preset.

The browser itself is divided into two columns allowing you to select a preset based on the type of whistle. You can create your own presets by clicking the Add button below the second column.

Clicking the More button will open a drop down menu offering you a number of options for importing and exporting your presets.

Search bar

You can filter the list of presets by typing in the search bar and hitting enter.

Clicking the star icon next to a preset will add it to your favourites list, clicking it again will remove it from your favourites. You can see all your favourites by clicking the larger star icon next to the search box above the first column of the preset browser.

You can save any changes you’ve made to a preset by clicking the Save Preset button next to the search bar.

Settings

Settings button

The settings screen gives you control over the sampler engine, hardware configuration, and MIDI options. The settings that are available will vary slightly depending on if you are using the standalone instrument or the plugin.

Engine Tab:

  • Standalone application only
    • Driver: This is used to set the audio playback system that the instrument will use. The choice of drivers will vary depending on your operating system.
    • Audio Device: You can select which hardware audio output device (soundcard/audio interface) you want the instrument to use.
    • Output: If your chosen device has multiple outputs you can use this menu to select which will be used by the instrument.
    • Buffer Size: This is the buffer used by your chosen audio device. Lowering the buffer size reduces latency but if it’s too low it can cause pops and clicks to be heard.
    • Sample Rate: This is the sample rate of your chosen audio device. The available options will vary based on your hardware.
  • Standalone application and plugin
    • UI Zoom Factor: You can increase or decrease the size of the instrument’s interface using the options in this menu. All of the instrument’s graphics and text are designed to scale perfectly without blurring or fuzziness.
    • Streaming Mode: Select the option that suits the type of drive you are using to store the instrument’s samples.
    • Max Voices: The amount of polyphony the instrument can handle. If the value is too low you may notice some dropouts when playing a lot of notes.
    • Clear MIDI CC: Use this button to reset all MIDI continuous controller assignments you have made using the MIDI learn feature.
    • Change sample folder location: If you move the samples to a new location you can use this button to point the instrument to them.

MIDI input tab: Displays the hardware MIDI devices that the instrument can see. You can check the boxes alongside the device names to enable those devices for MIDI input. This tab is only visible in the standalone application

MIDI channel tab: From here you can select the incoming MIDI channels that the instrument will respond to.

MIDI automation tab: Displays information about any MIDI continuous controller numbers you have assigned using the MIDI learn feature. It also allows you to adjust the range of values that the continuous controllers will use and provides you with a quick way to invert the values if desired.

About tab: Shows information about the plugin. If you ever require assistance with the plugin it’s a good idea to provide its version number which you’ll be able to find in this tab.

Acknowledgements

Studio: Riverside
Recording Technician: Sarah McNeill
Musician: Mimi O’Malley
Editing & Scripting: David Healey
Graphic Design: Koke Núñez Gómez
IDE: HISE

Sordina User Guide

A mute is a device a musician can fit to their instrument to change its sound. There is usually a reduction in volume and a change in tone depending on the instrument, the type of mute, and the performer.

A mute works like an acoustic equalizer. By blocking sounds and absorbing energy the mute filters out certain frequencies while allowing others to pass.

Introduction

Sordina is a VST effect plugin that runs on GNU/Linux, Windows, and Mac OS. It’s purpose is to emulate a wide variety of instrument mutes – currently brass and saxophone.

As with real mutes each of Sordina’s virtual mutes has a different character and responds slightly differently to the input signal they are applied to

Here’s an A/B comparison of a trombone playing with a real bucket mute and the original un-muted recording being processed by Sordina’s virtual bucket mute.

Installation

Please see the detailed installation guide for instructions on how to setup Sordina on your system.

Quick start

Sordina on Ardour audio track

As the plugin is intended to alter the sound of an audio signal it should be placed either after a VST instrument in the plugin chain, on a track containing audio, on an audio bus, or on the master output.

Sordina can be added to a DAW track as either an insert or send effect. This guide will assume it’s being used as an insert.

After the plugin has been added to the audio chain select a mute from the preset browser.

Interface

Sordina’s interface has few controls and is straightforward to use.

Quick Tips

If you hold the shift key on your keyboard while clicking on a knob you’ll be able to type in a specific value.

You can move the knobs on the interface more precisely by holding down the control key on your keyboard at the same time.

Double clicking a knob will reset it to its default value.

Clicking the Libre Wave logo will display some information about the plugin and provide a clickable link to the librewave.com website.

Mix & Gain

The Mix knob allows you to adjust the balance between the incoming dry signal and the processed wet signal. To recreate the true sound of the mute on a solo instrument this should be set to 100%. Values lower than this are useful for blending the sound with other instruments and for creative purposes.

The presets that come with Sordina have been volume calibrated against reference recordings but this calibration may not necessarily fit with the audio you will feed into the plugin. The gain knob allows you to adjust the output volume to suit your specific needs.

Frequency analyser & Meters

The window in the middle of the interface displays a real time frequency analysis of the incoming and outgoing audio. The yellow colour shows the unprocessed input signal, while the muted signal is displayed as blue.

On each side of this window is a traditional volume meter. The yellow one on the left shows the volume of the incoming audio while the blue meter on the right shows the volume of the processed output signal.

Filter

The knobs marked HPF and LPF control the cut-off frequency of a high-pass and low-pass filter respectively.

Like a real mute the response of the virtual mutes varies depending on the specific instrument being played. The filter is useful to alter the characteristics of the muted sound to adjust for such variations or to sculpt the output audio for a desired result.

A graphical representation of the filter is overlaid on the FFT analyser.

Wah Wah

When a compatible mute is selected the Wah knob will be enabled. This knob can be controlled in real time using host automation to create a live wah wah effect.

Automation

All of the knobs will respond to automation messages from your DAW. Check your DAW’s user guide for details on how to access automatable parameters.

You can load mutes on the fly by automating the Presets parameter. You should avoid doing this while audio is playing on the track where the plugin is inserted because it will result in unwanted clicks or pops. If you want to change the mute in the middle of a line you should leave enough silence in the part to avoid this issue.

Preset Browser

Sordina’s Preset Browser

The browser is divided into three columns. In the left column you can select the instrument you want to mute. For example if you are routing a trumpet recording or a trumpet virtual instrument into Sordina then you’ll probably want to select Trumpet & Cornet from this column. However there are many creative combinations possible by selecting a mute intended for a different instrument.

From the centre column you can select the type of mute. The options available will vary depending on the instrument. See the tables below for more details.

The third column displays the mutes available for the selected instrument and mute type. All of the virtual mutes in Sordina have been created by analysing recordings of real instruments and their mutes*. The names you see in the third column contain the brand of mute that was analysed and either the mute’s model or some other relevant information

Clicking the star icon next to a mute name will add it to your favourites list, clicking it again will remove it. You can see all of the mutes you have marked as a favourite by clicking the larger star icon next to the search box above the first column of the preset browser.

Search bar

You can filter the list of mutes by typing in the search bar and hitting enter.

If you’d like to save any changes you’ve made to a preset you can do so by clicking the Save Preset button next to the search bar.

Mutes

French Horn

CupHumes & Berg Stonelined
PracticeHumes & Berg Sh Sh
StopHumes & Berg Stonelined
StraightHumes & Berg PhilharmonicHumes & Berg StonelinedThe Warburton Tunable

Piccolo Trumpet

CupTom Crown Aluminium
HarmonTom Crown: Stem In/Out
MiscFelt
PracticeJo Ral AluminiumTom Crown Aluminium
StraightDenis Wick AluminiumJo Ral Brass BottomWallace Aluminium

Trumpet & Cornet

BucketHumes & Berg StonelinedJo Ral Brass Bottom
CupDenis Wick Adjustable 1Denis Wick Adjustable 2Humes & Berg Cup 1Humes & Berg Cup 2
Jo Ral TriTone
HarmonDenis Wick: Stem In/OutHumes & Berg: Stem In/OutJo Ral Bubble: Stem In/OutTom Crown: Stem In/Out
MiscFeltHumes & Berg PixiePlunger 1Plunger 2Plunger 3
PracticeBremner SshhDenis Wick AluminiumHumes & Berg Mel-O-WahMute Tube
StraightDenis Wick AluminiumDenis Wick PianissimoJo Ral Brass BottomJo Ral PlasticLeblanc AluminiumPro Tec FiberTom Crown AluminiumAlessi Vacchiano

Flugelhorn

BucketHumes & Berg Velvet Tone
CupHumes & Berg Stonelined
PracticeHumes & Berg AluminiumHumes & Berg Sh ShHumes & Berg Stonelined
StraightHumes & Berg AluminiumHumes & Berg Stonelined

Trombone

BucketHumes & Berg Bucket
Humes & Berg Velvet Tone
Jo Ral Aluminium
CupHumes & Berg Mic-A-MuteHumes & Berg Cup 1Humes & Berg Cup 2
Jo Ral Aluminium
Denis Wick Cup
HarmonHumes & Berg Wa-Wah: Stem In/OutJo Ral Bubble: Stem In/Out
MiscBuzzHumes & Berg CleartoneHumes & Berg Derby HatHumes & Berg PixiePlunger 1Plunger 2Solotone
PracticeHumes & Berg Sh ShLiberty Practice
StraightHumes & Berg StonelinedJo Ral Brass BottomSouloAlessi VacchianoTom Crown Straight

Bass Trombone

BucketHumes & Berg Velvet ToneJo Ral Aluminium
CupDenis Wick AluminiumHumes & Berg Mic-A-MuteJo Ral Aluminium
HarmonHumes & Berg Wa-WahJo Ral Bubble: Stem In/Out
MiscPlunger
PracticeHumes & Berg Sh Sh
StraightDenis Wick AluminiumHumes & Berg StonelinedJo Ral Brass Bottom

Euphonium

PracticeDenis Wick Aluminium
Straight
Humes & Berg StonelinedJo Ral Aluminium

Tuba

PracticeSchlipfVoigt
StraightHumes & Berg StonelinedJo Ral Aluminium

Saxophone

PracticeE-Sax WhisperMMDSax Mute One

*Libre Wave and Sordina are in no way affiliated or endorsed by the manufacturers of the mutes analysed for the creation of this plugin. Their names and trademarks are referenced only as descriptors for the user’s information.

Acknowledgements

Produced by: David Healey
Demo Audio: David Budimir
GUI Design: David Healey

Michaela’s Harp User Guide

The traditional Celtic harp is an ancient instrument native to Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and parts of Northern France. For this library I recorded a modern harp with a warm tone and a built in pick-up. This allowed me to create a direct input (DI) recording in addition to two stereo microphone positions.

Michaela’s Harp is a beautifully sampled Celtic harp virtual instrument. It features three microphone positions, multiple velocity layers, damped and stopped samples, and playable triplets.

The library was recorded in a studio rather than a large hall so the samples aren’t particularly wet which will help you to blend and layer them with your other instruments.

A live performance recorded during the sampling session.

Musician

To create this wonderful library we spent a day in the studio with the talented Michaela Dorrity. Michaela studied with Brenda O’Somochain in Derry, receiving her Senior 4 (grade 8) certificate in 2012. Since that time she’s been taught by Máire Ní Chathasiagh, Rachel Newton and Fiana Ní Chonaill and competed in the Fleadh Irish music competition for the last three years, qualifying for the All Ireland Fleadh and reaching first place in the Donegal, and Northern Region of Britain Fleadhs. We’re sure you’ll enjoy this virtual replica of Michaela’s harp but if you’d like to hear the real instrument in action, or perhaps have Michaela perform at an event, you can contact her through her Facebook page.
Michaela Dorrity

To create this wonderful library I spent a day in the studio with the talented Michaela Dorrity. Michaela studied with Brenda O’Somochain in Derry, receiving her Senior 4 (grade 8) certificate in 2012.

Since that time she’s been taught by Máire Ní Chathasiagh, Rachel Newton and Fiana Ní Chonaill and competed in the Fleadh Irish music competition, qualifying for the All Ireland Fleadh and reaching first place in the Donegal, and Northern Region of Britain Fleadhs.

If you’d like to hear the real instrument in action or have Michaela perform at an event you can contact her through her Facebook page.

Installation

Please see the detailed installation guide for instructions on how to setup Michaela’s Harp on your system.

Sample Sets

Sustains

The “Normal” sample set includes four velocity layers, chromatically sampled across the entire range of the instrument. These are recordings of the plucked strings and their sustain (longer for the lower notes, shorter for the higher notes) with the natural resonance of the other strings. This sample set is accessed by selecting one of the presets in the Normal category.

The “Damped” sample set is a single velocity layer, chromatically sampled across the whole range of the instrument. For this sample set all of the strings surrounding the one being recorded were damped. This resulted in a less resonant sample set with a crisper attack on each sample and a more defined sustain. This sample set is accessed by selecting one of the presets in the Damped category.

Triplets

Playing quick groups of three notes is a common occurrence in Celtic harp music and is not easy to simulate with individual plucked samples.

The triplet samples were recorded over the mid-range of the instrument (C3-A4) where this technique is most often used, with the remaining key range covered through pitch stretching of the lowest and highest samples.

In order to be able to perform the triplet in real time the samples have been sliced up and are controlled in a round robin fashion. For example to play a triplet on middle C you just need to hit the note three times in a row and each sample of the triplet will play in order.

You can create variety in the speed of the triplet by how fast you play the notes. Each key has its own internal counter which is reset if the key hasn’t been played for two seconds or more.

Triplets played in real time

Stopped

Another common technique is for the musician to cut short the resonance of the lower strings during a performance. This creates a percussive staccato feel and has a unique sound as the strings are quickly stopped.

Michaela’s Harp includes a set of stopped samples that covers the lower range of the instrument (C1-C3). These samples are activated by engaging the sustain pedal (CC64) before releasing the keys.

Stopped strings

Main Interface

The interface of Michaela’s Harp is simple to use while providing a lot of options for customising the sound and playability of the instrument.

Quick Tips

If you hold the shift key on your keyboard while clicking on a knob or slider you’ll be able to type in a specific value.

You can move the knobs and sliders on the interface more precisely by holding down the control key on your keyboard at the same time.

Double clicking a knob or slider will reset it to its default value.

Clicking the Libre Wave logo will display some information about the library as well as a clickable link to the librewave.com website. You can click the Instrument button to leave this screen.

Automation

Most of the sliders and knobs on the interface can be controlled with a continuous controller. You can assign a hardware controller to a control using MIDI learn: just right-click a control, select MIDI learn, and move a hardware knob, wheel, or fader to assign its MIDI controller number to that control. You can right-click the control again to remove the assignment.

Many of the on-screen controls will respond to automation within your DAW without needing to assign a CC to them first. Check your DAW’s user guide for details on how to access automatable parameters.

Keyboard & Articulations

The illuminated keys of the on-screen keyboard show the playable range of the instrument. Keys outside of this range will not trigger any samples.

The three red keys at the lower end of the keyboard are used to change articulation

  • C0: Enables either the normal or damped sample set based on the currently loaded preset.
  • C#0: Like C0 this enables the sustain sample set. However when you release the key the note will be retriggered. This is useful for performing fast repeated notes.
  • D0: Enables the triplets sample set.

You can also change articulation using CC32 or MIDI program change. With either of these methods a value of 40 will enable the sustain articulation and a value of 41 will enable the triplets articulation.

Mixer

At the left side of the interface are the microphone controls.

Each microphone position has a channel strip that controls its volume, pan, stereo width, and delay. The DI channel is mono only so its width control has no effect on the sound.

Below each volume fader is a button that can be used to purge or load the samples for that microphone position. These buttons also indicate the name of the channel: Close (C), Direct Input (DI), Room (R).

Envelope

On the right hand side of the interface you’ll find the envelope controls. These allow you to adjust the attack and release time of the sustain samples.

Round Robin

Below the envelope controls is the round robin button which is used to toggle the round robin repetition feature on or off. This solves the problem of the same sample being triggered when a note is played multiple times, also known as “the machine gun effect”.

The round robin scripting will automatically switch samples when a note is played more than once. Each note is individually tracked and their internal counters are reset if they haven’t been played for two seconds or more. The round robin is completely random so it may occasionally trigger the same sample twice in a row.

Velocity Curve Editor

This control can be used to change how the instrument responds to MIDI velocity.

You can move nodes around by clicking, holding, and dragging them. New nodes can be added to the table by clicking anywhere that doesn’t already have a node, and you can delete nodes by right-clicking on them. Hover your cursor over a node and move the scroll wheel on your mouse to adjust the curve between that node and the one to the right of it.

Settings

The settings page gives you control over the sampler engine, hardware configuration, and MIDI options. The settings that are available will vary slightly depending on if you are using the standalone instrument or the VSTi plugin.

Engine Tab:

  • Standalone application only
    • Driver: This is used to set the audio playback system that the instrument will use. The choice of drivers will vary depending on your operating system.
    • Audio Device: You can select which hardware audio output device (sound-card/audio interface) you want the instrument to use.
    • Output: If your chosen device has multiple outputs you can use this menu to select which will be used by the instrument.
    • Buffer Size: This is the buffer used by your chosen audio device. Lowering the buffer size reduces latency but if it’s too low it can cause pops and clicks to be heard.
    • Sample Rate: This is the sample rate of your chosen audio device. The available options will vary based on your hardware.
  • Standalone application and plugin
    • UI Zoom Factor: You can increase or decrease the size of the instrument’s interface using the options in this menu. All of the instrument’s graphics and text are designed to scale perfectly without blurring or fuzziness.
    • Streaming Mode: Select the option that suits the type of drive you are using to store the instrument’s samples.
    • Max Voices: The amount of polyphony the instrument can handle. If the value is too low you may notice some dropouts when playing a lot of notes.
    • Clear MIDI CC: Use this button to reset all MIDI continuous controller assignments you have made using the MIDI learn feature.
    • Change sample folder location: If you move the samples to a new location you can use this button to point the instrument to them.

MIDI input tab: Displays the hardware MIDI devices that the instrument can see. You can check the boxes alongside the device names to enable those devices for MIDI input. This tab is only visible in the standalone application.

MIDI channel tab: From here you can select the incoming MIDI channels that the instrument will respond to.

MIDI automation tab: Displays information about any MIDI continuous controller numbers you have assigned using the MIDI learn feature. It also allows you to adjust the range of values that the continuous controllers will use and provides you with a quick way to invert the values if desired.

Preset Browser

The preset browser is accessed by clicking the Presets button. Michaela’s Harp includes a selection of default presets and you can also create your own.

New presets can be added by first selecting a category in the left column and then clicking the Add button below the right column. The other controls below the right column allow you to edit or delete existing presets.

The two categories on the left – Damped and Normal – indicate which of the two sustaining sample sets is used by the preset. Any new categories you add will use the sample set of the last loaded preset.

Clicking the More button will open a drop down menu offering you a number of options for importing and exporting your presets.

The name of the currently loaded preset is always displayed on the interface. The arrows on either side of the preset name can be clicked to load either the previous or the next preset.

Acknowledgements

Produced by: David Healey
Musician: Michaela Dorrity
Recording Technician: Sarah McNeill
Sample Editing & Scripting: David Healey
GUI Design: Koke Núñez Gómez


Installation guide

If you are installing a Libre Wave virtual instrument the installation is done in two stages; first you’ll install the software plugin and standalone application, then you’ll install the samples.

If you are installing a Libre Wave effect plugin you’ll only need to follow the instructions for installing the software as there will be no samples to install.

Video tutorials are provided in addition to the written instructions.

Installing the software

Every product includes separate installers for GNU/Linux, Windows, and Mac. Please follow the installation instructions below for your operating system.

GNU/Linux

The GNU/Linux installer has a .sh file extension. It needs to be run from the terminal. The simplest way is to drag the installer file onto an open terminal window and press Enter. If you see a command not found error you will need to grant execute permissions to the installer, how you do this will vary depending on your OS. In Linux Mint you can right click the .sh file, select properties, click the permissions tab, and check the execute box.

The software license will be displayed. You can scroll down a whole page by pressing the Space Bar or a single line by pressing the Enter key.

Video: How to install on GNU/Linux
Running the installer from the terminal

Once you reach the end of the license you’ll be prompted to accept its terms. Type y if you accept the terms and want to continue the installation or n if you don’t and would like to exit. Then press the Enter key.

If you accepted the terms of the license you’ll be asked if you would like to install the VST plugin version of the software. Type y if you do and press the Enter key, you’ll then be prompted to enter a location to install the plugin. You should enter the full path to an existing directory, if the directory doesn’t exist the installer will ask you to choose another location. If the directory you choose requires root permissions then you’ll need to restart the installer with root access (sudo).

Enter the full path for the location you’d like to install the plugin

If the software includes a standalone application you’ll now be asked if you would like to install it. Type y if you do and press the Enter key, you’ll then be prompted to enter a location to install the standalone application. You should enter the full path to an existing directory, if the directory doesn’t exist the installer will ask you to choose another location. If the directory you choose requires root permissions then you’ll need to restart the installer with root access (sudo).

The standalone installation will also place the license file and application icon into the install directory. You can use this icon for any desktop or menu shortcuts you create for the standalone application.

Enter the full path for the location you’d like to install the standalone application

The software installation will now complete and you can move on to installing the samples.

Successful install

Windows

The Windows installer has a .exe file extension, double click it to launch the setup wizard. The first screen will present the software license, if you agree with its terms select I accept the agreement and then click Next.

License agreement
Video: How to install on Windows

If the library contains a standalone application you might be asked to select the location you’d like it installed.

On the next screen you’ll need to supply a location to install the 32bit version of the plugin. These don’t need to be the same location as each other or the same location where you will install the samples.

Choose a location to install the 32bit plugin

Now you need to select a location for the 64bit version of the plugin. This does not need to be the same location where you will install the samples.

Choose a location to install the 64bit plugin

You’ll now be given the opportunity to customise the installation. You can choose which components you’d like to install by marking the checkboxes next to them. Once you’ve made your selections click Next.

You can customize the installation

A final confirmation screen will be shown. Here you can review the installation configuration and if it’s correct click Install to begin the installation.

Final confirmation

Once the installation is complete click Finish. You can now move on to installing the samples.

Successful installation

MacOS

The MacOS installer has a .pkg file extension, double click it to start the setup process. If the installer is blocked by your system security you will need to open the MacOS security and privacy settings application and allow the installer to open.

Click Continue in the security prompt that pops up and then click the Continue button at the bottom of the window.

Security prompt

Read through the license document and if you accept its terms click Continue and then Agree.

Video: How to install on a Mac
Click Agree if you accept the license terms

Select the hard drive on which you want to install the software. This doesn’t need to be the same as the location where you will install the samples.

Then click Continue.

Choose an install drive

The next screen allows you to confirm that you selected the correct install location and informs you of how much disk space the software requires. You can click the Customize button if you’d like to choose which components are installed. If the software includes a standalone version this will be installed in Applications folder.

Click Install.

You can customize the installation

You’ll be prompted to enter your password to confirm that you want the installation to proceed.

Password prompt

The installation process will begin and the on-screen progress bar will keep you informed of the current status.

Installation progress

You’ll see the following screen once the plugin installation is complete. Click Close and you can now move on to installing the samples.

Successful install

How to install the samples

Sample installation tool

If you’re installing a Libre Wave virtual instrument you will have received one or more .hr files. These contain the audio samples that need to be extracted.

When you open the instrument for the first time you will be presented with two buttons, click Install Samples.

You’ll then be prompted to select the file that ends in .hr1. Then you’ll be asked to select the location to extract the samples to.

This doesn’t need to be the same location where you installed the plugin. For the best performance it is generally recommended to install samples on an SSD.

When you have selected the destination folder the sample installation tool window will open. This provides you with two additional settings – Overwrite existing samples, and Delete Sample Archive after extration. For a first time install I recommend leaving both of these at their default value.

Click ok. You’ll then have a short wait while the samples are extracted to your chosen location.

After the process is complete you might see a prompt saying The sample directory does not exist, click the Ignore button. Now you’ll need to close and reopen the plugin or standalone application to complete the setup.

What to do if something goes wrong

Follow these instructions if something went wrong with the sample installation process and you want to start over.

Go to the folder that contains the configuration files for the sample library and delete all the files it contains. Then reopen the sample library and everything should be just as it was before you extracted the samples.

The configuration files were created when you installed the software. The location of these files varies between operating systems.

  • GNU/Linux: /home/username/.config/LibreWave/
  • Windows: Users/username/AppData/Roaming/LibreWave/
  • MacOS: ~/Library/Application Support/LibreWave/
    • You’ll need to hold down the ALT key while opening the Go menu in order to be able to access the Library folder.

Moving the samples to a new location

Relocate the samples

If at some point after installation you move the samples to a different location you will need to redirect the sample libraries search path.

You may be prompted to do this when you run the library after moving the samples or you can do it manually by going into the settings page of the plugin and clicking the Change sample folder location button.

Sofia Woodwinds User Guide

Sofia Woodwinds is a collection of solo orchestral woodwind instruments. The library was recorded by Four for Music on their main recording stage in Sofia, Bulgaria. We recorded using three microphone positions – close, decca, and hall/wide.

Installation

All Libre Wave virtual instruments and effects follow the same installation procedure. Please see the detailed installation guide for instructions on how to setup this product on your system.

Interface

  • Hold down ctrl or cmd to increase precision when you move a knob or slider.
  • You can double click a knob or slider to reset it to its default value.
  • When you move a knob or slider with your mouse its value will be displayed.
  • If you hold the shift key while clicking on a knob or slider an input box will be displayed where you can enter a specific value.

Automation

To use MIDI learn to link a continuous controller (CC) to a knob or slider:

  1. Right click the control.
  2. Select MIDI learn.
  3. Move a hardware knob, wheel, or fader to assign it to the control.

Many of the knobs have default CC assignments. You can view all CC assignments in the MIDI Automation tab of the Settings window. This is explained in more detail later in this guide.

You can remove CC assignments, including those assigned by default, by right-clicking the control and selecting Remove CC.

Many of the on-screen controls will respond to automation within your DAW without needing to assign a CC to them first. Check your DAW’s user guide for details on how to access automatable parameters.

On screen keyboard

The playable range of the currently loaded instrument is illuminated on the on screen keyboard. Grey keys are outside of the playable range and produce no sound.

Legato

Legato Controls

The left side of the interface provides a few sliders to tweak your legato performances.

  • Offset: Adjusts the smoothness of legato transitions. A higher value results in a smoother transition but in some contexts may cause the transitions to sound “synthy”. Lower values are good for creating more clarity, especially in fast passages and trills.
  • X-Fade Intensity: The crossfade time of each legato transition is calculated on the fly during your performance. You can think of this slider like a compressor, it controls the range of values that the crossfade time can be. If the slider is set to 0 then no crossfade will be used and instead the fade time will be determined by the envelope time set in the Release Tails panel.
  • Pitch Intensity: This controls the amount of pitch bend that is added during legato transitions. It’s a very subtle effect and will be more noticeable on some patches than others. If the X-Fade intensity slider is set to 0 then no pitch bending will be applied.
  • Transition Gain: A legato transition consists of three samples. The initial note of the phrase, a mid-transition sound, and the destination note. This knob provides control over the mid-transition volume.
  • Glide Rate: Provides a choice of standard note lengths which are used to determine the duration of glides.
    • The button to the right allows you to disable the slider and use note on velocity to control the glide rate instead. In this mode playing with a higher velocity results in a shorter glide time.

Release Tails

Release Controls

Release tails are samples that play when a key is released. They complete the sound of the note and provide a natural room reverb. The controls in this panel allow you to adjust how the release tails behave.

  • Purge: Enabling this button will unload the release tails from memory and disable the Gain and Decay sliders.
  • Gain: Controls the volume of the release tail samples.
  • Decay: Controls how quickly the release tail samples fade out.
  • Envelope Time: Controls the envelope release time of the sustain samples.

Performance Controls

Performance Control knobs

Velocity

Note on velocity (how hard you hit a key) controls the attack of each note. Playing a low velocity will create a longer attack and a high velocity will produce a shorter attack.

Velocity can also be used to control the initial Dynamic of a note. To activate this functionality you need to enable the small round button next to the Dynamics knob. This will cause the Velocity Control button to be displayed which you can then activate.

Expression

The expression control provides an overall volume change to the instrument. This can be used in conjunction with the dynamics controller to customise the dynamic range of the instrument and create niente effects.

Dynamics

Each instrument was recorded at three dynamic levels between pp and fff. The dynamics controller allows you to smoothly crossfade between these recordings. A volume change is also applied automatically by this controller to keep the dynamics consistent and realistic across the range of the instrument.

Flutter

With the exception of the oboes, cor anglais, and contrabassoon all of the instruments include flutter tongue recordings.

The flutter knob controls the crossfade between the sustain and flutter samples. Flutter samples will only be triggered when the knob is at a value of 5 or greater. This reduces the instrument’s voice count and saves system resources when flutter tonguing isn’t required. The downside to this is you have to remember to set the knob to at least 5 before playing a note you want to flutter.

Vibrato Intensity & Rate

The vibrato intensity knob controls the depth of vibrato.

The vibrato rate knob controls the speed of the vibrato. A lower value will produce a slower vibrato while a higher value creates a faster vibrato.

Vibrato Parameter Controls

Random variations are added to the vibrato in real time to give it a more natural and human feel. These variations adapt to the intensity and rate you are using.

Vibrato is a complicated effect that combines changes in pitch, volume, and timbre. You can have full control over the balance of these parameters by enabling the small circular button next to the vibrato Intensity or Rate knobs.

Pitch Bend Wheel

You can use your MIDI keyboard’s pitch bender wheel to bend the pitch of a single note up or down by up to one semi-tone.

Response Curves

Next to each performance control knob is a small button which when enabled will display the response curve for that control. If none of the buttons are enabled the response curve for velocity will be displayed.

You can edit the response curve to adjust the control’s sensitivity.

Mixer

Mixer

The mixer provides a channel strip for each of the three microphone positions: close, decca, and hall.

  • Delay: Used to add a time delay of up to 500ms to the channel’s signal. This is useful when positioning the instruments in a virtual environment and helps to create separation between the channels.
  • Width: Provides control over the stereo width. The default value is 100%, this keeps the channel’s width true to the original recording. A higher value will increase the stereo width of the channel. A lower value will reduce the width. A value of zero results in a mono signal. The close mic is a mono channel and as such its width control has no effect.
  • Pan: Below the width control is the channel’s pan slider. This controls the left/right balance of the channel. Each instrument’s Close channel is by default panned according to the musician’s position on the scoring stage. The Decca and Hall channels are positioned centrally, providing an accurate stereo position of the musician in the room.
  • Volume: The vertical fader below the pan slider controls the volume of the channel.
  • Purge: To the left of each volume fader is a power button. This can be used to load or unload the channel’s samples. Unloading the samples will disable that channel and reduce the instrument’s memory usage.
  • Output: At the bottom of the channel strip is the output menu. This is used to select the stereo output for the channel. To make use of this you must be using the instrument as a plugin inside a host that supports multiple outputs. Please check your host’s user guide to setup the output configuration correctly.

Master Channel

In addition to the three microphone channel strips the mixer includes a master channel. This provides control over the final output of the instrument after any adjustments made by the other channel strips.

  • Coarse: Tuning control in the range of -12 to +12 semitones.
  • Fine: Tuning control in the range of -100 to +100 cents.
  • Pan: This controls the left/right balance of the instrument.
  • Volume: The vertical fader provides the final stage of the instrument’s volume control. It can also provide a gain boost of up to +3dB at its highest position.

Preset Browser

Preset Browser
Preset Name

The preset browser is accessed by clicking the name of the currently loaded preset in the rop right corner. You can click the name again to close the preset browser. The arrow buttons can be used to load either the previous or next preset.

The browser itself is divided into three columns allowing you to select a preset based on the family and type of instrument.

Clicking the More button will open a drop down menu offering you a number of options for importing and exporting your presets.

Search Bar

You can filter the list of presets by typing in the search bar and hitting enter.

Clicking the star button next to a preset will toggle its availability in your favourites list. You can see all your favourites by clicking the larger star icon next to the search bar.

You can save any changes you’ve made to a preset by clicking the Save Preset button.

Settings

Settings Window
Settings

The settings screen gives you control over the sampler engine, hardware configuration, and MIDI options. The settings that are available will vary slightly depending on if you are using the standalone instrument or the plugin.

Engine Tab:

  • Standalone application only
    • Driver: This is used to set the audio playback system that the instrument will use. The choice of drivers will vary depending on your operating system.
    • Audio Device: You can select which hardware audio output device (soundcard/audio interface) you want the instrument to use.
    • Output: If your chosen device has multiple outputs you can use this menu to select which will be used by the instrument.
    • Buffer Size: This is the buffer used by your chosen audio device. Lowering the buffer size reduces latency but if it’s too low it can cause pops and clicks to be heard.
    • Sample Rate: This is the sample rate of your chosen audio device. The available options will vary based on your hardware.
  • Standalone application and plugin
    • UI Zoom Factor: You can increase or decrease the size of the instrument’s interface using the options in this menu. All of the instrument’s graphics and text are designed to scale perfectly without blurring or fuzziness.
    • Streaming Mode: Select the option that suits the type of drive you are using to store the instrument’s samples.
    • Max Voices: The amount of polyphony the instrument can handle. If the value is too low you may notice some dropouts when playing a lot of notes.
    • Clear MIDI CC: Use this button to reset all MIDI continuous controller assignments you have made using the MIDI learn feature.
    • Change sample folder location: If you move the samples to a new location you can use this button to point the instrument to them.

MIDI input tab: Displays the hardware MIDI devices that the instrument can see. You can check the boxes alongside the device names to enable those devices for MIDI input. This tab is only visible in the standalone application

MIDI channel tab: From here you can select the incoming MIDI channels that the instrument will respond to.

MIDI automation tab: Displays information about any MIDI continuous controller numbers you have assigned using the MIDI learn feature. It also allows you to adjust the range of values that the continuous controllers will use and provides you with a quick way to invert the values if desired.

About tab: Shows information about the plugin. If you ever require assistance with the plugin it’s a good idea to provide its version number which you’ll be able to find in this tab.

Performance techniques

The library is designed to be performed in real time and contains a few features to make obtaining a realistic performance easier and more natural for a keyboard player.

Using a breath controller

When the Breath button (under the Dynamics curve editor) is enabled the breath controller mode will be engaged. In this mode no sound will be triggered unless the Dynamics knob is at a value greater than 10. If the knob’s value drops below 10 any notes that are playing will be stopped. You will probably want to assign your breath controller to the Dynamics knob or use one of the breath presets.

Long notes

Holding down a key will sustain a note indefinitely. Every sample will loop so you can maintain a note of any length. For a realistic performance you should try and keep in mind how much air the player would be using to hold the note and stop when appropriate.

You can use the continuous controller assigned to dynamics to create swells, crescendos, diminuendos, or any other dynamic expressions. A breath controller, mod-wheel, or expression pedal is perfect for this.

Short Notes

To play a short note just release the key earlier and the note will be shorter. Play the note at a higher velocity with a brief swell on the dynamics controller to create a punchy staccato note. Using more or less force, releasing the key earlier or later, and varying the dynamics can create a variety of short articulations.

Attack and Accents

Playing very softly, with a velocity below 20, will trigger a slower attack, a velocity above 20 but below 70 will trigger a normal attack.

When playing at velocities of 70 or above a staccato overlay sample will be triggered first and blended smoothly into the start of the sustain sample.

Legato

Playing in an overlapped style, holding one note while playing the next, will trigger a legato transition between the notes. You don’t need to worry about pacing your playing to get a smooth transition or to compensate for lag. The instrument will detect your playing speed, the pressure you’re using on the keys, and a few other parameters to calculate each transition.

Glides

Glissandi, slides, portamento, and smears can be triggered by pressing one key while another is already held and your sustain pedal (or other controller assigned to CC64) is engaged. You can glide across any interval using this method. The rate of the glide is controlled using the Glide Rate slider or velocity depending on the settings you’ve chosen in the Legato panel.

Same note legato

A sustain pedal (or other controller assigned to CC64) can be used to trigger a legato transition on a single note. When the sustain pedal is held down any key that is released will be retriggered. Releasing the sustain pedal will end the note.

If you want to trigger a same note legato transition immediately after a glide you need to release the sustain pedal at the end of the glide and then hold it down again before releasing the key to retrigger the note.

Trills

Trills of any interval, duration, or tempo can be played in a very natural fashion using the built-in retrigger feature. Hold down the first note of the trill while pressing and releasing the second. This is especially realistic when the library is used in combination with a breath controller linked to dynamics.

Chords

Although the instruments in this library are monophonic it is sometimes useful to be able to play two or more notes at once. The library has a built in chord detector that will attempt to differentiate between a legato transition and playing a chord. There is no guarantee that it will be accurate 100% of the time. If you try to play a chord but only one note sounds it means the system thought you were trying to play a legato transition. This feature should be used sparingly and is included as a tool for composing rather than for crafting a realistic performance.

Acknowledgements

Studio: Four for Music
Recording Coordinator: Yuliyan Stoyanov
Musicians: Piccolo, Flute I: Petyo Kolev. Flute II, Alto Flute: Cvetelina Beleva. Oboe I, English Horn: Kostadin Yotzov. Oboe II: Valentin Metodiev. Clarinet I: Mihail Jivkov. Clarinet II, Bass Clarinet: Martin Churov. Bassoon I: Alexander Sarandev. Bassoon II, Contrabassoon: Atanas Bakurdjiev.
Editing & Scripting: David Healey
Graphic Design: Reza Rizaldy (Flatheart)
Help & Advice: Christoph Hart, Elan Hickler, Raymond Radet, Ivy Audio
IDE: HISE

Creative Commons License